Fort Hood & Angels Armed With Pens

I never heard of Fort Hood until the day of the shooting. My friend Andy called and said, “My nephew is there.” I had recently started doing volunteer work for troops and I thought maybe I could do…something. Anything.

What happened at Fort Hood?

On November 5, 2009, a lone gunman went on a shooting rampage at Fort Hood, an Army base in Texas. He killed 13 people and wounded 32 others. The accused is U.S. Army Major Nidal Hassan. His legal issues have been in the news recently.

Before their first deployment

My friend’s nephew “TM” was in a unit that was about to deploy for the first time. Their mission would be to find and clear roadside bombs in Kandahar. But his unit hadn’t even left Texas yet and they had casualties. One of TM’s buddies worked closely with some of the soldiers killed and felt the loss even more.

Maybe I could get a little support going for that one soldier, a few caring letters. TM thought that was a good idea. I’d said I’d try.

Just a few months earlier I had adopted a soldier. When I saw I was really making a difference for him, I wanted to do more. Two adoptions would be too much for me. But I found that Soldiers’ Angels (SA) had all kinds of programs (as well as adoption.) I started doing Wounded Warrior TLC – letters to the wounded in hospitals so they know they are not forgotten. I asked the TLC team leader if we could get a few people to write to TM’s buddy. She said she would do it and ask some of her most experienced Angels to join her.

Hung up 

At first, TM’s buddy was surprised to hear from strangers. But then he was moved and hung up the letters for others to see. I was asked if SA could help the entire battalion.

SA is almost all volunteers. They get lots of worthy requests so I wasn’t sure if I could make this one happen too. They were already doing projects at Fort Hood for the victims’ families and the wounded. And I was new at this and a little shy to ask for more help. But I did ask. SA put my request out and the letters starting pouring in from all over the country.

Barb has a heart as big as Texas

One Angel that responded, Barb, got large groups of people to write. She also wanted to help this battalion when they deployed. She wrote to TM about being a Point Of Contact.   Neither of us knew what that meant exactly. Barb explained:

“His job as a POC is to take up everyone on their offers, open the boxes, share with everyone and send an e-mail to the person sending the box to let them know it arrived. Just a very short message is okay. He will also need to inform us if anyone needs a morale boost. Things that might be in short supply and I need to know what his favorite junk food is! Inform us or you if someone is not getting mail. He really should put the whole unit up for adoption through SA as soon as he has addresses for the unit.  Wing tip to wing tip we will get er done!”

Wow. So this went from a few letters for one soldier, to a battalion, to caring about a battalion for their upcoming deployment. This is more than me or TM ever expected. POC is also more than TM could do in his particular job.  Luckily another soldier could take that on. Meanwhile, as the mail continued to arrive in Texas, TM wrote:

“The letters have been coming in fast and numerous. I actually just picked up a box filled with letters from Barb. The support is absolutely amazing!! The (unit name) greatly appreciates all the love you and Soldiers’ Angels have shown!”

Armed with a pen

Do I think a simple letter can make everything okay? No. But I think it can connect two people, even if just for a few moments. With absolute certainty, care is given and received. I think both hearts are just a little better for it. It’s also something I can do. If I had superhero skills or if I could bake (yes those are on the same level for me) I might take action in those ways. But doing something…anything, feels better than not. Whatever your skill or interest is.  Of course it also helps to have a few Angels on your side.

© Gina left the mall, 2012

Even The Storms Are Beige

sandstorm

sandstorm (Photo credit: bzo)

my marineMy Marine in the desert was tired of beige. The sand was beige. The tents, trucks, uniforms, even the storms, while tremendous to witness, were beige. When I asked him what he was missing, he said: color. Especially the green of nature. For a minute I thought about sending him a handful of grass and some fall leaves. Instead, I sent him 25 postcards of Central Park all at once (15 arrived on one day. The rest over the next year) He hung them up in his tent so they would be the first thing he saw every morning. I laughed at how excited he was to get them. He reminded me not to take the little things for granted. In fact, he asked me to notice and appreciate them for him. I promised I would. But every day is busy and after a while I noticed that I kept forgetting to notice. I felt bad about this unkept promise to a man I never met.

We “met” over coffee

My Marine, Gunnery Sergeant MZ, had signed up with Soldiers’ Angels to be adopted and was on the wait-list. Volunteers like me would send a letter or one-time care package to hold them over. I had sent him coffee and a mug and we wound up becoming pen pals. He was what some at Soldiers’ Angels would call my “unofficial.” That’s someone you support but not at the same commitment level of adoption which is one letter a week and one care package a month for the duration of deployment.

Little Is Big Day

To make up for my delay, I decided to appreciate as many little things as I could for a whole day. Here’s just the first two:

1. Hot shower

I usually turn on the water without thinking. But this morning as I paused to appreciate this act, a certain troop I helped came to mind:

“We spend most of our time in a very remote outpost living and working with the Afghan National Army, living a very meager existence.  We don’t have showers or running water. We live out of the back of our armored vehicles or from our rucksacks. We are very far from home. Anything you could provide my soldiers would be greatly appreciated.  Some of my men do not have families in the States who can support them.  Our communication back home is infrequent and unreliable. Letters and packages are our lifeline and the only way we know we are not out here alone.”

2. Waking my daughter up

This is usually a difficult task as my daughter is the U.S. Sleep Champion. And she only trains on schooldays. But this morning I thought of all my troops who were separated from their children. I remembered a female combat medic I wrote to with three kids. Her youngest was a little girl the same age as mine. They were both starting 1st grade. This combat medic would miss every wake-up struggle for the whole year and more. Then suddenly this difficult task felt like a gift. I get to do this in freedom and safety because other men and women are not doing it. This is part of what they sacrifice when they raise their hands to serve.

A promise kept

Little Is Big Day turned out to be very meaningful and sometimes emotional. But it helped me hit the reset button. So now even on busy days, I’ll take a moment to find a little something special around me. If you try Little Is Big Day, please let me know how it turned out. As for mine, I’ll tell you somewhere in an arid sea of beige, I made one Marine very happy.

© Gina left the mall, 2012